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Food Security Amidst Second Wave of COVID-19 in Nepal

Food Security Amidst Second Wave of COVID-19 in Nepal

As the world is facing the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic which officially started last year, the corona virus is no longer a “new normal”. The government of Nepal has imposed a regional lockdown and enforced its federal, regional, and local level structures to respond to the crisis, being fully cognizant of its vulnerabilities. Nevertheless, the situation is alarming.

Nepal's food security situation is exacerbated not only by domestic factors ( weak policies and institutional arrangements, and poor governance), but also by the effects of COVID-19. It aggravates food security by restricting movement, closing down all restaurants, production, markets, and malls except for emergency needs, despite the fact that these are steps designed to slow the spread of virus and mitigate potentially devastating economic and social effects in Nepal, and reflect measures taken by most countries. The virus has made it difficult for already impoverished and marginalized groups to survive. Particularly, western Nepal and Terai region appears to be more prone to disasters and food insecurity. People are facing great food price inflation at the retail level, owing to the lingering supply disruptions caused by lockdown. Higher food prices have a significant influence on people with low and middle incomes than on people with high incomes.

Food security is achieved when “all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life” (FAO, 1996). This description allows the determination of four distinctive dimensions of food security; the physical availability of food, economic and physical access to food, food utilization and the stability of these three dimensions over a period of time. Perhaps unexpectedly, the preliminary assessment found a negative effect on all four dimensions of food security in Nepal as a result of the current  outbreak. The pandemic has caused quick disruptions in food environments by both external aspects, such as food availability, prices and vendors and personal aspects, including geographical access, affordability, convenience and accessibility.Access to food is not fully assured as a result of the decline in incomes and loss of livelihood by it. It is further impaired by socio-economic inequities. The stability of food availability and access will depend on how soon the contagion is controlled to allow free movement of goods and persons to restore food supply chains. The utilization of food is impacted by the absorptive capacity of people, which is constrained by incomes and health standards that are adversely affected by the  pandemic. The capacity of the common man to purchase and absorb nutritious food has declined due to rising health issues as a result of novel coronavirus. Reduced calorie intake and compromised nutrition threaten gains in poverty reduction and health and could have lasting impacts on the cognitive development of young children. Inadequate food production is still the major cause of food and nutrition insecurity. Indigenous food systems have also been obliterated, resulting in food insecurity and severe hunger in areas where indigenous communities predominate.

Now, the question is how these best practices can be institutionalized and scaled up in order to support farmers and produce more food locally in the future. As a result of the pandemic and the resulting food shortages, indigenous/local food systems have become increasingly relevant. Previously, indigenous foods and local farming systems were overlooked and, in many cases, discarded, which harmed indigenous populations. As it is necessary to have in place economic and social policies to safeguard food security and nutrition, digital marketing that connects local producers and consumers implemented in a few sites deserves further development and upscaling. It’s important to minimize the amount of food waste which ensures the highest food safety standards. Higher economic growth, equitable distribution, and a mix of policies such as effective implementation of anti-poverty programs, improved health education, and employment are required to address the food insecurity problem. Eradicating hunger and food insecurity necessitates the ability to engage in enthusiastic political association and deliberation. Poor and women-focused research, extension, and capacity-building programs should be prioritized. In order to increase demand, distribution and access to food, the Government must prioritize irrigation agricultural production and road linkage.

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4th School for Young Ruralists - Peru Bicentennial Edition

An opportunity to design projects that contribute to rural agricultural development in Peru.

2021 is the second year in which the pandemic continues to affect Peru's economic and agricultural sectors. Especially agriculture which is one of the less admired and recognized sector, despite its importance to the population’s survival.

Given this context, we believe that it is necessary to keep a training space that inspires commitment to rural agricultural development especially as regards the youth. That is why on May 1st we inaugurate our fourth School for Young Ruralists. It is a virtual space design to develop capabilities in youth for the generation of new agricultural projects.

This year our call reached more than 400 applicants at a national and regional level. As a result, 120 young people were shortlisted, including 20 from Metropolitan Lima, 80 from different regions of Peru, and 20 from countries such as Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Paraguay. We need to highlight that has 54% of the participants are women. The future scholarship recipients may be part of a cultural ecosystem rich in experiences, learning, and support from senior professionals.

Our initiative is possible thanks to the financial support of the United States Embassy in Peru, and our allies the Universidad Científica del Sur (UCSUR) for academic support, The Alumni USA Network, the Ypard Latin America and Caribbean Regional team, and the Latin American Network of Rural Extension Services (RELASER).

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My YPARD online internship experience

The first YPARD encounter

It was just a normal school day in my class at the faculty of tropical agrisciences. With full concentration, continuous note-taking and a constant sip of my cup of green tea which was helping with the struggle to stay awake…Well I had just arrived from Africa, full of dreams, full of motivation, no winter or early dark night can stop me now, so it was either the class nap or my future…Hahaha. Okay back to the story. Just after the class with one of our amazing teachers in the faculty, we were told we had a guest. I was even more alert this time, then came this young lady, she was a representative of YPARD Europe operating from the Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CULS) here in the Czech Republic. I was smitten. She spoke beautifully on the great benefits of being a part of the young professionals for agricultural development movement. The most interesting part about YPARD that caught my attention was the movement’s mission to enable and empower young people in agriculture to shape sustainable food systems.

She also mentioned that the YPARD movement was not a European movement only, it was a worldwide affair. I was equally amazed at how much impact young professional were making in Europe and even all over the world. Most of my classmates had lots of questions and most were answered, and I was really pleased while also strategically thinking of the nearest future.

The internship

In 2020, the pandemic struck, I had spoken to a few friends of mine about internship positions they might know of as this was a prerequisite to graduating from the faculty of tropical agrisciences. After much search, I was introduced to the communications and fund-raising officer of the YPARD movement in Europe (Stacy Hammond), who mentioned that my internship must be online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. I was not so pleased; how could I possibly cope with being an online intern, what could I possibly learn? But I kept an open mind.

In December 2020, I had my first meeting with Stacy Hammond. After the meeting, I was totally convinced I was in for a ride, majority of all the things she said went over my head, I had no clue, “write a blog, post on social media, find opportunities, interview.”

My internship kicked off in 2021. I had all the support; all my questions were answered every step of the way. Although my first task was a total disaster in my opinion, but I was greatly encouraged by the guidance I got from Stacy Hammond.

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YPARD and AGRINATURA e-competition: Winners of the PhD. category

We want to send a big thank you to everyone who participated in our contest and helped make it a success!

And a special congratulations to Charles Amarachi Ogbu, Dr. Marwa Shumo, Okafor Uche Cyprian, Dita Mervartováand Sidi Rana Menggala, the five selected winners of the YPARD/AGRINATURA Research Story e-Competition entitled ‘your Research your Story!’

These five stories stood out the most from all the entries, and have been crowned the winners!

Visit the links below to see all of the winning contest entries.

Charles Amarachi Ogbu

This piece will take us to the research story of the Treatment of Wastewater: A case of Robbing Peter to Pay Paul? What is the justification for wastewater treatment since it incurs cost and pollutes the environment?. Enjoy reading his story at https://bit.ly/3sNUvWy and at https://bit.ly/2QHJE37 

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Impact on increasing sell price of cinnamon bark to Kerinci’s crime rate

This blog post emerged as one of the five winners that participated in the YPARD and AGRINATURA e-competition for the PhD. Category. The competition which was tagged ‘your Research your Story!’ aimed to help students have a better sense of ownership of their research and to communicate the most important parts of their research in a creative easy to read storytelling way.

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Since the market price of cinnamon bark from the species Cinnamomum burmannii (Nees & T. Nees) Blume had increased in 2014, the raw material became one of the most important trade value and income in Kerinci Regency's economy. However, like other economic sectors, the spices industry has threats, such as increased production costs, unpredictable weather, low investment, and crime/theft. In particular, crime has reached alarming levels in the regency, with some villages like Gunung Raya subdistrict areas experiencing the highest criminal activity increase. Cinnamon bark theft in Kerinci Regency is a well-organized crime syndicate that involves individual unscrupulous community members (outside Kerinci) who want to make money stealing raw material cinnamon bark from the farmers, in which they had waited 5 – 15 years of harvest time. The crime rate in rural Kerinci Regency, West-Sumatera, Indonesia, has increased, with most of the crimes related to cinnamon bark theft. Hardly a day goes by in Kerinci regency without the local media reporting the crime against the theft of cinnamon bark and farmers' actions to prevent the sacrifice from recurring (Kerincitime.co.id).

The thieves peel the cinnamon bark at night, transport it with motorcycles, and rushed to the nearest middleman to sell the bark at three-quarters (3/4) of the regular price so that residents are not suspicious. This crime risk situation is exacerbated by the geographical and topographic characteristics of rural areas in the Kerinci regency. Many of the cinnamon farmers in Kerinci live far from their properties (plots), and most of the time, they are not available to guard their property for 24 hours. The commute takes 30 minutes to 1 hour to reach the location; in other words, it is very isolated. This opportunity gives thieves the perfect opportunity to steal and peel the cinnamon bark with little chance of getting caught. Unfortunately, most of these crimes were not investigated and administratively well by the local police. Therefore, official police crime reports do not reflect the actual cinnamon theft in the Kerinci regency, particularly in some remote areas. Therefore, the continuous loss of bark makes the community unease and brutal in which ultimately killed the thieves that are captured by hand. Unlike Sungai Penuh city, where law enforcement is present, rural areas and villages experience limited police quick response on this matter. In most cases, police visits are limited, and if they do, it is a follow-up to an investigation or report of violent crime or other illegal behaviour. Rarely are they serious about investigating property crimes, especially against agriculture, preferring to prioritize and resource for "urgent and important" offences such as murder, rape, and tenure conflicts. Cinnamon bark theft in Kerinci District is becoming more professional, with criminal events well planned, choreographed, and coordinated, therefore, leaving little trace of evidence and making it more difficult to track and make arrests (M.berito.id).

Thieves are targeting cinnamon plots, which are easily accessible and can quickly sell this commodity. The criminal activity also takes place at certain times and seasons of the year, such as the rainy season when it is more difficult to access for others. Cinnamon farmers nowadays take standard security precautions, such as peeling the bottom to top, night guarding (patrolling) in the fields, establishing temporary huts on their property to prevent theft of cinnamon bark at night. Crime in rural areas, especially the theft of cinnamon bark, creates difficulties for farmers who may not have adequate resources and knowledge about prevention. Preventing the theft of cinnamon bark is a severe problem for Kerinci farmers who are forced to take action by enduring cold nights guarding their properties or deliberately killing suspected perpetrators. Against this background, my hypothesis is to test the effectiveness of crime prevention interventions from the farmers' perspective. Therefore, the main question is how to prevent cinnamon bark theft and crime prevention strategies at the village and group levels in the future?

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The world pharmacy that has been losing its secret keepers

This blog post emerged as one of the five winners that participated in the YPARD and AGRINATURA e-competition for the PhD. Category. The competition which was tagged ‘your Research your Story!’ aimed to help students have a better sense of ownership of their research and to communicate the most important parts of their research in a creative easy to read storytelling way.

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The impact of tourism and modern technology on the indigenous peoples of the Amazon have been particularly intense in the last decades. Recently, young natives from local villages are moving to cities,  pushed by imaginations about a better future. But these youths often do not correspond to this world,  as they very quickly forget the place which they came from. This makes them confused. They are reminiscent of an unpredictable shot that is rushing forward to new tomorrows. Illusions sometimes leave faster than they came, but it is too late to return to the previous lifestyles. 

A larger village suddenly becomes a town and a town becomes a huge city in a while. Cities are bursting at the seams. Moreover, in an accordance with the rapid development, the infrastructure does not exist as same as the waste management and neither other essentials of a big city. Employment has never been high, but now there is little work. And it will be even less, although the population is still increasing. 

Forests are being cut down with all the wealth we know it is, but we will never have the opportunity to find out what we have never really discovered before, because of our greed for consumption. And the  Amazon hides a lot of unexplored secrets. We also lose lots of knowledge through the loss of ethnic groups. We will never learn how to use plants and their various combinations again, which have been discovered and used for thousands of years. Some plant compounds together form an ideal structure that has a positive effect on the human body. Out of the millions of options, the people there have been learnt for centuries, how to use a unique compound with another one in an order to eliminate the occurrence of side effects. But indigenous tribes came out with these results without technologies. But we still consider the inhabitants of the forest to be primitives, who certainly by chance found out to such conclusions. But what if they know other rules that the model governs? 

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Treatment of Wastewater: A case of Robbing Peter to Pay Paul? What is the justification for wastewater treatment since it incurs cost and pollutes the environment?

This blog post emerged as one of the five winners that participated in the YPARD and AGRINATURA e-competition for the PhD. Category. The competition which was tagged ‘your Research your Story!’ aimed to help students have a better sense of ownership of their research and to communicate the most important parts of their research in a creative easy to read storytelling way.

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What happens to wash water from kitchens, bathrooms, animal pens, and milking parlours? In a typical African setting, it either flows into open drains, underground soakaway, or along the streets behind the buildings. But, in some big cities, it flows down unseen to a controlled facility for treatment. One can only imagine what it takes to make such wastewater pure again. Is it even possible? Science and technology have made it possible to recycle water for garden watering, irrigation, and in rare cases drinking and cooking.

Normally, wastewater treatment involves the removal of pollutants and the destruction of microorganisms. However, deeper research and ‘’sleepless nights’’ in the laboratory discovered value in the recovery of these materials. Materials recovered are often in a semi-solid form called sludge which contains, metals, nutrients, and organic matter. Besides, this sludge can be exploited to generate energy by the use of technologies and the residue applied as organic fertilizer.

Also, arguments exist for the rationale behind wastewater treatment since water is almost everywhere -so it seems. In reality, however, there is a limited amount of water on earth and if abused will lead to greater problems. Of course, water is “gold’’ in most countries in northern Africa and the middle east. Therefore, care must be taken not to harm ourselves and our surroundings. Then comes the sucker punch -how do we tell when, or if we are harming our surroundings since we could always visit the doctor to know our health status. Who do we run to, to check the health status of the environment? A hint could be drawn from climate change outreach and cautions on the television signalling that the earth is sick.

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The quest for ground apple

This blog post emerged as one of the five winners that participated in the YPARD and AGRINATURA e-competition for the PhD. Category. The competition which was tagged ‘your Research your Story!’ aimed to help students have a better sense of ownership of their research and to communicate the most important parts of their research in a creative easy to read storytelling way.

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A welsh saying goes thus “ An apple a day keeps the doctor away”. This proverb influenced my eating habits in my growing days, as a teenager. I got so used to taking Apples as desserts, daily.

These fruits are quite expensive as they are usually imported to Nigeria. The seed cultivation or vegetative propagation is nearly impossible, maybe, due to the tropical climate of Southern Nigeria. “You are a plant scientist, you can’t continue spending so much on this fruit”, think of an alternative or better still, cultivate it in the garden,” said my mum angrily.

Moved by those words, I tried several methods breaking dormancy of its seed, all to no avail. Then, a thought came, can there be an alternative? A plant be grown tasting like an apple, delicious and highly nutritive and can be eaten raw?

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Flies and Love at first sight

This blog post emerged as one of the five winners that participated in the YPARD and AGRINATURA e-competition for the PhD. Category. The competition which was tagged ‘your Research your Story!’ aimed to help students have a better sense of ownership of their research and to communicate the most important parts of their research in a creative easy to read storytelling way.

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Little did I know when I started working with black soldier flies that they would talk me on a breathtaking journey? I fell in love with the black soldier flies the first time I set my eyes on them. I remember how my heart skipped a beat and I knew it was love at first sight, well at least from my side.

As a PhD student, you spend a lot of time together with your research topic, in my case; I spent a lot of time with these flies. They smelled terrible most of the time, but their sleek wasp-like figure that looks nothing like your ordinary housefly captured my interest. During their larval stages, they crawled out of the rearing chambers and as adults; they flew out of cages and all over the place. I kept on looking for them behind the doors and underneath the tables and everywhere. Somehow, I still love them as much as I did when I first saw them. After all, love is blind or is it not?

When people adapted to an urban lifestyle and migrated to cities following the industrial revolution, they started viewing insects as undesired pests. Unbeknownst to many of them, insects play an essential role in the web of life. They simply decompose waste. As a PhD scholar, I identified common urban organic waste streams and used them to rear my beloved black soldier flies. In a matter of no time, the flies decompose the waste streams and manage to uptake most of the nutrients out of them. Once they reach their prepupal stage, their dry matter content is almost composed of 50% protein. In addition, they contain quality quantities of minerals, vitamins, amino acids and fats. The significance of the black soldier flies is not only limited to their ability to decompose almost any type of organic waste, but rather to the possibility of producing sustainable and nutrient-rich livestock feeds out of them. The leftovers of the decomposed wastes are also suitable as organic soil fertilizers. By adapting to such sustainable and green waste decomposition and feed production methods, we can build circular and bio-based economies without further exploiting our already scarce natural resources.

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Food security: A nonstop business for all

2020 was supposed to be our year…a year of new beginnings, the much-discussed "Vision 2020", flying cars, self-replicating robots, another iPhone and, of course, the new Black Widow movie. And while we did not get most of these things, almost no one could have imagined we would end up with the Toilet Paper Apocalypse, endless Twitter threads, or even a Pandemic.

Despite worldwide lockdowns, movie-like research speeds and top-notch hygiene practices, the COVID-19 pandemic still spreads around the globe like Genghis Khan in the 13th century. However, the Coronavirus did not just rob us of Friday night hangouts, and A summer of globe-trotting, but also our most precious resource, food, was not spared.

Food security is not a new thing. Since our days of congregating in caves, humanity has always worried about what to eat, how to cook what we eat, and how to store what we eat to have it for later. The pandemic brought to light inadequacies in our food industry, particularly faults in long-term storage, distribution, and transportation. And while this may have led to terrible wastages and caused food prices to shoot up in some parts of the world, I believe we could describe it as a necessary evil. Innovation and radical change have always come from times and periods of immense strife.

While we have generally figured out food processing in all forms, I believe we still have a long way to go in storage, particularly in disadvantaged regions, for long-term situations. And who better to be involved in this venture if not the very individuals whose very life is to food and feeding? Also, we must figure out more efficient transportation systems and networks for distributing foods, not just over long distances, but during times of crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic and, more recently, the Suez Canal dilemma.

If nothing else the COVID-19 pandemic has drastically highlighted the need for food security, at the individual, household, national, regional and global levels. This can only be achieved when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life!

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The future of agriculture and your future as a professional in agriculture

The Coronavirus pandemic may have turned most of us into Netflix-guzzling vampires due to unending lockdowns and masks, but there is no doubt it also brought us something we all needed…a break.

For me, the COVID-19 lockdowns and remote schooling slowed everything down. It was a relief I never thought possible, and for the first time in two and a half decades, six schools, two continents and four languages, I finally had time--real time--to reconsider, strategize and plan. Naturally, the first thing I did was try my hand at Tik-Tok videos (It was a terrible failure, and I have since deleted my account and left that app to the Gen-Z gods). Next, I tried learning to cook meals from my home country. In truth, most of the meals turned out mostly “okay", but it would have broken my dear mother's heart to learn how terrible my cooking had become.

However, towards the end of last year, with news of exits and fundraising from tech startups, I decided to hunt for gold and learn to code. While my coding career is still very far off, my surge of inspiration is undying, and this is because I understand that in the nearest future agriculture and information technology will soon be dearest cousins.

However, this is the future. Perhaps it is not exactly the way we envisioned it, but it is our future. Now is a time for a mental renaissance of what sustainability and innovation in food, farming and agriculture should be. I believe 2021 and the wave of research and investment in Science and Technology the Coronavirus brought may be a steppingstone into a brighter and more diverse future in Agriculture.

The Pandemic may have accelerated advances in Science and awakened a thirst for Technology, particularly Financial Technology, but I believe 2021 is Agriculture's oyster. From research into sustainable farming practices in developing nations to the Hollywood-like potential of Agri-tech, the post-corona future is sure to be filled with incredible excitement in the field of Agriculture.

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E-meet YPARD Network Engagement Coordinator

Glindys Virginia Luciano, the new Network Engagement Coordinator at YPARD shares a video introducing herself and her role at YPARD GCU. 

Ms. Luciano joined YPARD three weeks ago and has identified the different areas in which she hopes to put her energy in and to bring change into the network. The New York City native shares how her own research interests in sustainability, consumption patterns, and meat consumption first brought her the YPARD community. 

Besides focusing on engaging the entire YPARD community at the global level, Ms. Luciano would like to find ways to support Agriprenuers and young researchers that are bursting at the seams with innovative ideas that can disrupt and transform our food system.  If you want to know more about Ms. Luciano or would like to discuss ideas that you believe will be valuable to YPARD as a network feel free to connect with her on LinkedIn and Twitter (she spends a lot of time there!). 

For any ideas or questions, you can send her an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Additionally, should you be interested in getting more involved with the YPARD Global Coordinating Unit, look at the current internship call to be a Fundraising and Development intern

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YPARD Europe is partnering with the AgriSciences Platform (AgriSci-UA)

We are happy to announce our new partnership with the AgriSciences Platform for Scientific Enhancement of Higher Education Institutions in Ukraine.

The AgriSciences Platform aims to strengthen the capacities and cooperation of young teachers, researchers, masters and doctoral students at selected Ukrainian universities by creating a platform – AgriSciences Platform for sharing information on Agrarian Sciences.

Through the partnership with YPARD Europe, there can be expected further promotion of agricultural sciences among young professionals and further enhancement of quality of AgriSciences research as well as the exchange of information, exchange of stories, cross-posting and sharing of relevant contributions and information. All of which can lead to a bigger impact and can connect more young researchers, professionals and practitioners.

“I am very happy about this partnership, as YPARD Europe is the next logical step for the AgriSciences Platform to reach a bigger audience and playing a more prominent role in the field of AgriSciences,” says Dr. Hynek Roubík, founder of the AgriSciences Platform and Group leader of the Biogas Research Team at the Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Czech Republic. “I can´t wait on all the mutual benefits this partnership is creating” closes Dr. Roubík.

“IYPARD Europe has been fostering youth engagement in sustainable food systems and agriculture in 20 countries in Europe. Collaborating with AgriSciences Platform will be a great step in supporting young professionals and early career researchers in Ukraine and the surrounding region”  says Dr. Libuška Mercl, YPARD Europe coordinator. “By sharing relevant information we can transfer valuable knowledge between young people in agriculture and enable them to shape sustainable agricultural systems which is one of the core objectives of YPARD” adds Dr. Mercl.

Stay tuned to hear more about the new YPARD Europe – AgriSciences Platform partnership!

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Deadline extended! YPARD/AGRINATURA e-Competition: Share your BSc or MSc research story!

As a student or young professional, the ability to create a succinct yet compelling narrative about your work is an invaluable skill. By effectively translating complex/technical research into accessible language, you can better inform, educate, and inspire your audience. Especially in these uncertain times of COVID-19 where there is not much opportunity to talk about your research face-to-face. Sharing your research story through blogs and social media is a creative way to keep colleagues, friends, family and the general audience informed about your research.

Whether it is at a virtual event, professional conference, a graduate/professional school interview, a casual dinner with friends or any situation in between, being able to share your research as an interactive story that peaks the audience interest is a skill every student must have!

To further encourage students to share their research story, YPARD in collaboration with AGRINATURA have developed a friendly Research Story e-Competition entitled ‘your Research your Story!’ This event is meant to help students to have a better sense of ownership of their research and to communicate the most important parts of their research in a creative easy to read storytelling way.

Participants will compete through blog submissions. The goal of this competition is to effectively communicate one's work/idea/story through a short, one-page blog. Participants are allotted one A4 page (500 words) to share a compelling story about their research and its significance in a language appropriate to a non-specialized audience.? All Bachelor and Masters students or recent graduates affiliated with any European university involved in agricultural research and development or creative work in any field of agriculture and food systems are encouraged to compete for prizes!

Instructions for submission:

To take part in this competition you need to do the following:

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Male's 99skincare- What will Your Face Look like in Five Years?

Imagine if I informed you that five years from today the face of yours might look younger than it lets you do these days? I understand that it may sound absurd, but exciting advancements in men's skincare have made it feasible so that you can maintain your rugged way of living without struggling the aging effects of exposure to the features. This suggests that you are able to still love doing golf, climbing, fishing, camping and every other patio activity without worrying the sunshine, breeze as well as air flow pollutants will create mayhem on your physical appearance. For a lot of men anti aging skincare is turning into a regular part of their day grooming routine.

Five years from but, if you really want see your face to look as younger or young than it does nowadays, you definitely should use quality products which work with your skin's all-natural power to sustain its handsome, vibrant appearance. The most potent men anti-aging 99skincare applies components that penetrate into skin cells and arouse the treatment, repair and defense out of the consequences of getting older. The objective isn't to apply "spackle" to fill up in your creases and collections. The goal is to improve your skin coming from the insides out.

If perhaps you are wondering, "So, merely what exactly are these robust ingredients?" here is a brief list which will help you narrow the search of yours for quality male's skincare. Keep in mind that the formula have to be present in high concentrations, or perhaps their usefulness will be restricted.

Natural, plant-based moisturizerAntioxidants

Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant. Antioxidants go to work inside your skin layer cells to battle against bad air pollutants known as free radicals . These molecules are accountable for growing old your skin layer and also creating apparent creases and collections. For equally males and ladies anti aging skincare has to be proficient at reducing the production of free radical groups or it won't be effective.

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From Afghanistan to an European Space Agency startup

At YPARD we value and celebrate diverse opinions, ideas, and perspectives, we also believe in the innovative ability of young people in agriculture and their capacity to shape sustainable food systems.

Here is an inspiring and phenomenal story of a young agricultural professional, LukᚠT?ma. His story is both unusual and remarkable and he has been able to make a success out of the mixture of both information technology and agriculture.

Here is Lukᚒs story!

Hi! Lukᚠhere. I am an agricultural analyst in Big Terra, a startup which “graduated” from The European Space Agency (ESA) Business Incubation Centre (BIC) Prague. I guess you could say that I am sort of a mixture between an IT guy, analyst and expert on crop production modelling. My workflow generally contains data wrangling (processing) with satellite imagery, playing around with NASA or Copernicus climate models and launching thousands of Crop growth simulations aiming at estimations of yield and optimization of crop production systems, mostly in developing countries. Of course, there are lots of other fancy keywords, which define my work – Artificial Intelligence (AI), Development projects, Food Security or Climate resilience and vulnerability.

So how did I get here? Well, I will have to disappoint you! My family background has nothing in common with agriculture, coming from the medical field. My educational path is more relevant but has been quite convoluted. I always wanted to write a book and studying agriculture in developing countries seemed to me to be a great source of inspiration! You can no doubt imagine it – travelling around the world, gaining experience with different cultures, languages and of course meeting interesting people and hearing their stories. And the “actual agriculture”? Haha! I thought – “Who cares” I wanna be a famous writer!” So, I started to study at the Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CZU) with quite a different agenda in mind.

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Welcoming YPARD Network Engagement Coordinator: Glindys Virginia Luciano

YPARD is delighted to welcome Glindys Virginia Luciano as the Network Engagement Coordinator.

Glindys Virginia is currently in her last semester of her master’s degree in Agrifood Systems and Rural Development at the Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague, Czech Republic, and a bachelor’s degree from Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut. 

Glindys Virginia has worked in various non-profit organizations in the United States and in Europe. Her involvement in food systems began at a young age. While doing her bachelor’s in Anthropology focused on food and sustainability, she was involved in many food initiatives including the Sustainable Food Market, in which she held the position of head coordinator for a year, additionally, she held the position of Sustainability Fellow focused on food systems. She was also a volunteer in the GROWNYC food scraps program to help reduce food waste. Currently, she is a graduate student where she is part of the APB research team at the Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague where she focuses on meat quality of game species, alternative protein sources and sensory evaluation.  Additionally, she is involved in the Euroleague of Life Sciences as an ELSA, where she helps to promote research in the life sciences and the support for young scientists in Europe.

At the account of joining YPARD as a Network Engagement Coordinator, this is what Glindys Virginia had to say:
“I am beyond excited to join a community of young people that are motivated to change and shift our food systems. We need change and so I am very much looking forward to engaging deeply with the YPARD community and provide support where it is needed.”

Welcome on board Glindys Virginia Luciano! 

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  • Czech Republic
  • Sharing Information and connecting people
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e-Competition: your Research your Story!

As a student, the ability to create a succinct yet compelling narrative about your work is an invaluable skill. By effectively translating complex/technical research into accessible language, you can better inform, educate, and inspire your audience. Especially in these uncertain times of COVID-19 where there is not much opportunity to talk about your research face-to-face. Sharing your research story through blogs and social media  is a creative way to keep colleagues, friends, family and the general audience informed about your research.

Whether it is at a virtual event, professional conference, a graduate/professional school interview, a casual dinner with friends or any situation in between, being able to share your research as an interactive story that peaks the audience interest is a skill every student must have!  

To further encourage students to share their research story, YPARD in collaboration with AGRINATURA have developed a friendly Research Story e-Competition entitled ‘your Research your Story!’ This event is meant to help students to have a better sense of ownership of their research and to communicate the most important parts of their research in a creative easy to read storytelling way.

Participants will compete through blog submissions. The goal of this competition is to effectively communicate one's work/idea/story through a short, one-page blog. Participants are allotted one A4 page (500 words) to share a compelling story about their research and its significance in a language appropriate to a non-specialized audience.?  All Bachelor, Masters and PhD. students affiliated with any European university involved in agricultural research and development or creative work in any field of agriculture and food systems are encouraged to compete for prizes!

Instructions for submission:

To take part in this competition you need to do the following:

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  • Czech Republic
  • Promote agriculture among young people
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The best culture is agriculture

Contrary to most people's perception about agriculture as being a poor-old man's occupation in the village, agriculture is certainly “the best culture” and has great potential to revive and drive our dwindling economy.

Amid global pandemics such as COVID-19 when almost all other sectors of the economy are on their knees, demand for agricultural commodity remains high. For instance, due to COVID-19 several industries have severely been hit including transport & energy industries following travel bans on commercial airlines. The tourism & hospitality industries are no exception.

Despite the global crisis demand for agricultural products such as food has remained high as everyone needs to eat regardless of the situation. Furthermore, medical and nutritional experts recommend the need for healthy diets to maintain strong immune systems in the fight against COVID-19. If anything, demand for Agricultural raw materials has increased due to COVID 19 as manufacturing industries are demanding more agricultural raw materials such as cotton to produce face masks and other protective clothing. Demand for fresh cassava tubers has also increased as it is being used as the main ingredient in the processing of ethanol for making alcohol-based hand sanitisers. In J. Buel's words "Agriculture is the Archimedean lever which, though it does not move a world, tends to fill it with plenty, with moral health, and human happiness."

According to the 2018 labour force survey report Zambia’s youth population is estimated at 5.8 million representing 35% of the national population, an amazing 5.8 x 100 billion neurons. This entails that the country is equipped with both cognitive capacity and adequate youthful manpower to drive the sector. Therefore, the youth should embrace agriculture and the government should make deliberate policies that support and encourage youth involvement in agriculture because it is envisaged that youth are creative and innovative, their innovation can be very key in improving the sector’s efficiency through technology.

Photo credit: Young Farmer Maanda

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  • Zambia
  • Promote agriculture among young people
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From flakes to snow: My love story with agriculture

If you had walked up to me sixteen years ago and asked if I wanted to study Agriculture? I would have probably looked at you like you were on something illegal and screamed "No!". Sometimes all it takes is one seemingly unimportant experience, one fleeting moment for your life to make sense, and for you to find yourself on a journey you would not trade for anything in the world.

The first encounter

I cannot stop thinking about my last trip to Finland and how, on my last night there, the snow seemed to glitter and sparkle and dance like tiny little living diamonds. It was nothing short of a spectacular view.

I guess the reason that the last day in Finland seems to have burrowed itself so deeply into my subconscious is that all that snow reminded me of being young and full of wonder. It reminded me of the child-like wonder I felt the first time I saw a cassava (a delicious and versatile root crop) processing facility in my hometown in south-west, Nigeria. It was an adventure for me. To see all those lumpy tubers turned into flakes was the closest thing to magic I ever saw as a child.

That one childhood experience, even though it lasted for about a half-hour, lit a fire in my heart that has continued to burn even till today.

However, I must admit I did not realize how much influence that experience had on me until I attended a seminar one year before graduating from high school. Truth be told, the talk was mostly dull to me. I stayed because attendance was compulsory, but then the speaker went into a long tirade about SDGs, zero hunger, and sustainable practices and I was sold. I knew then, at that moment, that I wanted to be a part of that. I knew that I wanted to be involved in agriculture, I wanted to be a part of the solution to feeding the world.

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  • Czech Republic
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